3 Job Interview Questions You Must Master

Job-InterviewWe all agree that going for a job interview can be a very nerve racking experience. All you need is confidence going in and you’ll be fine. BUT BUT BUT .. yes there are several buts and here are the answers to 3 of the toughest interview questions you need to master well.

When The Recruiter Asks: “Do You Have Any Questions?” Usually this question is always reserved for last during an interview, and it’s hardly a fluffy, throw away question. It may just seem like the interview is over and they are asking this question as a courtesy.

FORGET ABOUT IT!!

This can be the make it or break it interview question. Point is this .. the interview questions never stop until you actually leave the office!Your answer here will be the last thing they hear from you. You can so easily make it a memorable moment by having a really good question to ask. No self serving questions please, those are killers and reason enough to dismiss your chances. Asking about on going training’ or “‘if hired, I would be very interested in moving to the next level, can you tell me what certifications I would need’ or “‘can you tell me if there is a company policy in place should there be a Pandemic’ “‘ a thinking person asks these type of questions. That’ll be a great impression to leave them with.

If you do proper research on the company first, you’ll come up with great questions to ask them.

When The Recruiter Asks: “What Do You Know About Our Company?”

This is clearly where they get to see if you’ve done your homework. And again, it can make or break your chances for being hired. Remember you got the interview because you were qualified, so here’s your chance to show up prepared, it’ll be your edge over the other guy, remember he’s qualified too.

This is a hiring process, in essence, a competition, go in proactive .. a passive approach to any interview will backfire. Always be assertive, and never ever be aggressive. Qualifications aside, all interview questions / your answers, are in fact deciding your final interview score and you are being scored.

When The Recruiter Asks: “Can You Tell Me About Your Weaknesses?”

Remember, they never really want to hear about a weakness, they do want to hear how well you express yourself and deal with the actual interview question. Your answer always has to end in a solution that can be applied to the job at hand. Here’s a simple and yet great sample I teach all the time. “I used to actually have a problem saying no to people, these days with my time management and setting priorities skill set, I no longer have that problem as my To Do List manages me first, and saying no, is now a non issue”‘. Simple, concise and does in fact mention that you understand time management.

The interview questions and your answers are not hard, they just need prep and solid rehearsing out loud. Out loud because otherwise how will you know how smooth and convincing you are? That in itself will give you that extra confidence you need. Trust me, recruiters can spot confidence and sincerity a mile away. Remember, show them the real you when answering interview questions. Don’t give them template like, cookie cutter answers. Make notes, practice out loud, do more research, ask questions “‘ it all works and will always ensure a high interview score.

How to Reply to the Interview Question, Why Are You Available?

SollicitatietipsWhether you were let go from your job under unfair circumstances or for something you did and regret, scripting your job interview answer ahead of the interview will help you.

This is a question that is asked in almost every job interview. The interviewer wants to know, “Why are you available?” The answer you give regarding your departure from your last company will be either simple and straightforward, or very challenging – depending on your circumstances.

The following are three possible categories to answer the question of why you are available:

Need a Change/Challenge

Even the simple, straightforward answer can raise suspicions if the wrong message is conveyed. What if you are just tired of your job, don’t like your boss, or need a change? Everyone is entitled to a new position or challenge now and then, right? Of course, but the tricky part is telling the interviewer the reason you are leaving but not sounding like you’re “burned out” on your current job.

“I am looking for a new challenge. I have been with my current company for two years and don’t find the work as interesting as I once did. I am looking for a company where I can take on new challenges and learn new things.”

If your answer has too much emphasis on “challenge and change,” the employer becomes concerned that you may be dissatisfied with this job once you’ve learned new things and met the challenges. The interviewer is listening for patterns, and if you were bored on your last job, what makes you think you won’t get bored on this job?

Changing the tone of your reply to be more pro-active is a stronger answer.

“Since there are no advancement opportunities within the company, I decided it would be a good time for me to look outside. I have set some career goals for myself, and I know that I cannot achieve them at my current company. My goal is to work for a larger company with a possible career path.”

This answer has a tone of control and planning. When you think as an interviewer, it will help you see “their” point-of-view and will address the concerns “they” have about your leaving a company.

Laid off

If you are among the millions of people who have been laid off in the last two and a half years, you can simply state, “I was laid off.” This answers the question but still leaves a lingering doubt in the mind of the interviewer, – “Why were you laid off?” The more specific your answer, the more effective it will be.

“There were six rounds of layoffs at my last company. I survived five rounds, but when it came to round six they had to cut deep. My position was eliminated along with half of my group because the project we were working on was cancelled.”

Not everyone will have such a definite statement to make. Whatever your situation is it will be helped by including facts and figures to explain the circumstances surrounding your layoff.

“10% of the workforce was let go,” or “One out of every ten jobs was affected, company-wide.”

When you quantify a statement it has more depth. When you tell the interviewer whether it was 10 or 1000 people were laid off helps put the situation in perspective.

Fired

If you were fired, you probably dread being asked this question. Not only have you been fired, you have to talk about it – over and over. How you deal with questions about being fired will depend on how you have resolved the issue with yourself.

Whether you were let go under unfair circumstances or for something you did and regret, scripting your answer ahead of the interview will help you. You don’t want to bad-mouth your former employer or sound like a victim (even if you were). Practice your answer with someone in a mock interview and obtain feedback on your comfort-level while discussing your situation.

Preparing will make a difference

Any question can throw you off balance during the interview, but there are certain standard questions that you can almost expect to be asked every time. For example, “Why did you leave (or are planning to leave) your last company?” is a question that you can bet will be asked in one form or another in almost every interview. You will feel more confident and focused if you script and practice answering this question before it is asked.