A Good Interview Can Help You Land the Job You Want!

jobinterview

The job interview is the culmination of a successful job search, but to actually land the job you want, the interview must go well. A good interview will make all the difference in getting the job offer. Here are some tips to help you strengthen your interview presentation.

You probably already know that an interview can make or break your chance of getting hired. While a good interview can help you land the job you want, knowing what makes a good interview can help you to be more confident and better prepared.

There are a number of basic factors which too many people neglect to take seriously, so you should keep them in mind when planning for an interview. As the purpose of the interview is to let the prospective employer know that you are the person for the job, the way you present yourself at this first meeting will increase or ruin your chance of getting hired.

You want the employer to know that you are serious about your job searching. It is important to reflect this by dressing properly and attending to your grooming. If you are seeking a professional position, present yourself as a professional. This means wearing attire that is appropriate, not wearing any unnecessary jewelry, and using cosmetics only sparingly. It also means that you, as well as your clothing, must be immaculately clean. In addition, presenting a professional appearance means that your children, friends, and the use of gum or cigarettes have no place in or near your interview.

No matter what kind of job you are interviewing for, positive interview techniques are equally relevant for all. You should arrive for your interview before the scheduled time, make a point of using proper speech, avoid slang, and present a confident appearance.

As a good interview consists of providing the employer with the information he needs in order to consider you for the position, getting yourself in a positive frame of mind prior to the interview can be quite helpful. You will need to be able to answer his questions carefully and thoughtfully, but without any unnecessary delay. In addition to letting him know that you are qualified for the position, your interest in the company will show him that you are serious about this particular job. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the company, as this will let him know that you care about his specific business.

While a firm handshake begins and concludes a good interview, it is important to not neglect to follow up after the interview. A brief thank-you note will not only show the employer that you are courteous and that you appreciate the time he put into the interview, it is also an excellent reminder to him that you are interested in the job.

The difference between an interview and a good interview is in your preparation to present yourself in a positive manner, and to follow through with it both during the interview and afterward. A good interview is the determining factor in your success.

What to Bring to a Job Interview ?

What should you bring to an interview? Should you come with little more than your carefully groomed and polished self? When deciding what to bring to a job interview, many people fail to prepare. They think that bringing things to an interview makes them appear over the top, but the opposite is actually true. If you don’t bring anything, an employer may feel like you have come unprepared.

You should never attend an interview empty handed. At the very least, you should bring a copy of your resume. If you are being interviewed by a team, bring a resume for everybody that will be attending the interview. References are also required. Do not wait for the interviewer to ask for these. Offer them. Avoid carrying a handful of loose leaf papers. Carry your documents in a professional file and briefcase.

If you hold a professional license, you should bring evidence of your license to your interview. Bring anything that proves that you are legally able to perform the job that you are applying for. Positions that may require a professional license includes nursing positions, cosmetology positions and teaching positions.

When deciding what to bring to a job interview, many people decide to put together a portfolio that highlights their qualifications. It is a proven fact that visual aids are effective, so why not use these to your advantage during a job interview? Before you throw together a portfolio, gather examples of your best work only. Remember; a portfolio is an aid and should not take up the bulk of the interview. If your portfolio contains digital information, bring a laptop or some other medium with you. Do not expect your interviewer to supply the equipment. Avoid carrying bulky objects as well. Do not overwhelm the interview room with all of your gear. Keep it simple and professional.

Never forget essentials when deciding what to bring to a job interview. Be prepared for anything. Extra copies of your resume, breath fresheners, an extra pair of panty hose, deodorant, safety pins and a change of clothes are all good ideas. Be prepared for anything. This will help you stay calm and in control no matter what happens the day of your interview. Being prepared will help you concentrate on what really matters, like all of those questions you will need to answer.

After Your Interview – What Must You Do Next?

Job applicants having interview

Other than actually landing the interview itself and living through it, waiting after the interview and wondering whether you will get a phone call or a rejection letter can be one of the most difficult aspects of searching for a job. What you do after the interview should actually start while you are still ‘working’ the interview.

Prior to leaving make sure that you have noted the name of the person or persons who interviewed you. This will come in handy later for a number of purposes. Also, do make sure that you shake hands once again with your interviewer and thank them for taking the time to meet with you. Also, it’s not out of line to ask when they expect to be making a decision. This gives you a timeline to go by.

Always be sure to send a thank-you letter. This practice not only demonstrates good social etiquette but it also helps to keep you and your skills fresh in the mind of the interviewer. On some occasions an interviewer already has an idea by the time the interviews are completed who they will be calling to offer the job; however on many more occasions they still remain unsure who will be awarded that coveted slot. Sometimes they want a little time to ‘sleep’ on the decision or they may need to consult supervisors or others within their organization regarding the hiring decision. If a decision has not already been reached in the mind of the employer when all of the interviews have been completed, taking the time to send a thank-you letter can go a long way toward making sure you don’t get lost in the shuffle.

While it’s a good idea to send a polite thank you note to the person who interviewed you it is not a good idea to pester that person to no end. The only result you are likely to achieve through this strategy is alienating yourself from them and assuring that you won’t get the job. Although ‘don’t take no for an answer’ is a strategy that many aggressive job coaches recommend; it is still always best to observe polite social standards.

That is not to say that you should sit by the phone and allow several weeks to elapse, waiting, while you hear nothing and do nothing. Ideally, your thank you letter should have gone out the same day as the interview, no later than the following day. This means that the interviewer should receive it within one to two days following the initial interview.

Keep track of when the employer indicated a decision would be made and if that time has come and gone, it is perfectly permissible to go ahead and phone them. However; when you do make the call, be polite. State your name, the date you interviewed and the position for which you interviewed. You may say that you are following up to inquire as to whether a decision has been made.

At this point, the conversation can go a number of ways. The employer may indicate that a decision has been made and all candidates who were not selected will be receiving a letter in the mail. If this is the response you receive, it is your cue that you were not hired. Had you been, you would have received a phone call from the employer by now.

Thank them for their times, ask them to keep you in mind for any future vacancies and get off the line. Don’t burn any bridges. It could be that there was simply a better qualified candidate for that particular position, but they might consider you for a different, future position.

On the other hand, the employer may state that they are still reviewing resume, conducting interviews, etc, etc. This type of response could mean a couple of different things. It could mean that they really have made a decision and the person just doesn’t feel comfortable telling you on the phone that you weren’t selected or it could simply be taken at face value.

Perhaps something came up and their initial timeline has been forced to be extended somewhat. In either case, always remain polite and thank them for their time. After you end the call, make a note of the date on your planner and set a tickler to remind yourself to call back in a week if you still haven’t heard anything. Call back once a week, every week until a decision is made. Once a week is persistent; a trait which is to be admired. Once a day is pesky; a trait that should be avoided at all costs.

While it can be difficult to wait around after the interview, the most important two things that you should do is not blow the opportunity by annoying the employer with numerous pesky phone calls and by all means do not show up announced at their office door asking if they have arrived at a decision. Finally, make sure that you don’t pin all your hopes on one job. Yes, it may have been your first choice and your ideal dream job; however; this is probably also true for someone else as well. Use the time while you are waiting to hear back from the employer to line up your ‘B’ plan. Continue job searching, scheduling interviews and most importantly, reminding yourself that you can do this.

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